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Mississippi Moments Podcast

Since 1971, the Center for Oral History and Cultural Heritage has been preserving the memories of Mississippians from all walks of life. Our collection of over 4,000 interviews and counting has proven an invaluable resource for teachers, writers, researchers, and museums. While our collection has a recognized strength in the history of the civil rights movement and veterans' histories, the Center has collected broadly. The topics covered within the collection encompass the breadth of the state’s history.   Mississippi Moments began in early 2005 as a weekly series of radio spots broadcast statewide on Mississippi Public Broadcasting with funding provided by the Mississippi Humanities Council. Each episode features stories gleaned from hours of research, edited for time and clarity and narrated by Mississippi broadcast veteran, Bill Ellison. These stories range in topic and tone, but war stories and the struggle for civil rights receive the most attention. MSMO is not a History series. History frequently comes along for the ride, but Story drives the narrative. In 2009, the Mississippi Moments Podcast was launched as a way to make past and future episodes available online and searchable by subject. The podcast format allows us to greatly expand on the broadcast version and bonus content is a given. So give us a listen. With over 600 episodes available and new ones added each month, you are certain to find some amazing, moving stories about the diverse and colorful people who call Mississippi home.
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Now displaying: 2011
Apr 25, 2011

After working in Chicago for twelve years as an assistant pathologist, Jobie Martin came home to Mississippi to help his mother. He details how a job at the Gulfport Airport led to a remarkable career in broadcasting.

Apr 14, 2011

In 1976, Dorothy Moore of Jackson hit #1 on the R&B charts with the song Misty Blue, two years after it was recorded. She discusses her upbringing and how it affected her career.

Apr 8, 2011

For many people, music is a family tradition.  Blues guitarist Vasti Jackson of Hattiesburg recalls how family influenced his decision to play the blues. He also discusses growing up in McComb with neighbors like Wakefield "Big Moody" Coney.

Apr 1, 2011

In this final look at Jerry Clower's 1973 interview with the Center for Oral History, Clower discusses the difference his step father made in his life. He also talks about having fun without a lot of money.

Mar 24, 2011

Before the advent of refrigeration, farmers relied on a variety of innovative methods for preserving meat.  Boe McClure of Marshall County describes how they used to smoke hams in their smoke house. McClure also recalls how his mother preserved sausage using fertilizer bags and home canning.

 

Mar 18, 2011

Rev. John M. Perkins became involved in the civil rights movement after returning to Mississippi in 1960. He recalls being arrested in Mendenhall in 1969. After the arrest of Perkins and his young parishioners, people from around the county converged on the jail. Perkins marks this incident as the beginning of the civil rights movement in Simpson County.

Mar 14, 2011

The Civil Rights movement forced many Mississippians to rethink some long held attitudes. Humorist Jerry Clower speaks candidly about how his experiences and faith altered his views on race. 

Mar 9, 2011

For many years, farmers and share croppers relied on credit supplied by furnish merchants.  Humorist Jerry Clower of Liberty, Mississippi explains how this early lending system functioned and the history of the expression "making groceries."

Mar 9, 2011

In the early 20th Century, Mississippi’s fledgling cattle industry was plagued with tick fever. By 1929, it was obvious that something must be done to fight the state’s tick infestation. McComb newspaper publisher John O. Emmerich recalls how this new program was met with violent opposition.

Mar 9, 2011

Long time newspaper publisher G.O. Parker of Magee reflects on his early career and on the colorful history of politics in Simpson County.

Mar 9, 2011

For many years after the repeal of Prohibition, Mississippi remained a ‘dry’ state. Rev. John Perkins of New Hebron recalls how his family made ends meet by selling moonshine whiskey. He explains the difference between ‘homebrew’ and ‘moonshine.’

Jan 18, 2011

Hundreds of volunteers travelled to Mississippi in 1964 to teach basic literacy to African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement. One of those volunteers, Sandra Adickes, shares her initial impressions of Hattiesburg.

Adickes also recalls a trip to the Hattiesburg Public library with six African American students in the first attempt to integrate the city’s library.

 

 

Jan 18, 2011

Dorothy Nunnery of Brandon worked as a nurse at the VA Hospital in Jackson for 32 years. She recalls her time at the Jackson Infirmary Nursing School during WWII. She also recounts her first encounter with bed bugs.

Jan 18, 2011

Built in 1918 between Mendenhall and Magee, the Mississippi State Tuberculosis Sanatorium provided care and isolation for those afflicted with this terrible disease.  Dorothy Nunnery of Brandon recalls living on the grounds of the Sanatorium during the 1930s. Nunnery also explains the purpose of the Preventorium and remembers a family who came to stay.

 

 

Jan 18, 2011

Former Mississippi Supreme Court, Armis E. Hawkins, served as a district attorney in Chickasaw County in the early 1950s. He looks back on his early career.

Jan 18, 2011

Mississippi Supreme Court Justice, Armis E. Hawkins, joined the service in June 1942 with ambitions of becoming an officer.  The Marine Corps had other plans. Hawkins recalls his service during WWII.

Jan 18, 2011

The first African American Mississippi Supreme Court Justice, Reuben Anderson, remembers the racial climate of 1960s Mississippi. At Tougaloo College, he was inspired by the activism around him. He looks back on his career and his beginnings as a civil rights lawyer.

Jan 18, 2011

Senator Thad Cochran nominated Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Michael Mills for a Federal Judgeship in 2001. Mills recounts a getting phone call from the Oval Office. Justice Mills’ confirmation hearing before the Senate was just two days after 9/11. Mills remembers the patriotism and resolve of Americans to overcome the tragedy in the immediate aftermath.

Jan 18, 2011

One of Justice Michael P. Mills’ fondest memories from his tenure on the Mississippi Supreme Court was his friend and colleague Justice Michael Sullivan. He shares some of his favorite memories of his friend.

Jan 18, 2011

Retired Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Robert Sugg has fond memories of his days on the bench.  He remembers of some of his fellow judges. Sugg also recounts a fishing trip with fellow justice Francis Bowling.

Jan 18, 2011

Retired Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Robert P. Sugg wanted to be a pilot during WWII.  He recalls how a perforated ear drum prevented him from serving. He discusses his early career.

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