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Mississippi Moments Podcast

These are the stories of our people in their own words. From sharecroppers to governors, the veterans, artists, writers, musicians, leaders, followers, all those who call Mississippi home. Since 1971 we've collected their memories. The technology has changed, but our mission remains the same: to preserve those wonderful stories. Listen to Mississippi Moments Monday through Friday. at 12:30pm on MPB think radio.
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Now displaying: Category: podcasts
Nov 12, 2010

This spring marked the 50th anniversary of the first of the Gulf Coast wade-ins. Back then, most Mississippi beaches were for whites only.  During one of these wade-ins, Dr. Gilbert Mason led a group of African-Americans into the segregated waters of Biloxi beach.  What followed was one of the bloodiest race riots in Mississippi history with 71 arrested and dozens injured.

 

A small boy at the time, Le’Roy Carney recalls using the railroad tracks to flee the riot.  Carney also explains how the black community in Biloxi organized themselves to boycott those responsible for the violence at the beach.

Nov 12, 2010

Earnest Batiste, a US Army veteran and civil rights activist, remembers growing up during hard times. He describes the sacrifices made by his mother to put food on the table. Batiste reflects on the progress we’ve made and the difficulties of explaining that time period to a younger generation.

Aug 11, 2010

An army requires daily deliveries of food, ammunition and other supplies.  Mark Whitney of Natchez recalls working as a naval supply supervisor in Vietnam.  As a supply supervisor, Whitney learned that the locals were much smarter than the Americans assumed they were.

Aug 11, 2010

Former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Roy Noble Lee was interested in the law from an early age. Lee reflects on this and the courtroom atmosphere of 1920s Brandon, Mississippi. Justice Lee also recounts getting the opportunity to try his first criminal case, at the age of 19.

Jul 20, 2010

Today’s Tree farmers like Charles Barge of Noxubee County must always look to the future.  Barge tells how he began investing in the future by planting new trees and why it is important to do so. He recounts how the Conservation Reserve Act has led to greater opportunities for hunting and recreation.

Jul 20, 2010

Tree Farmers are landowners who voluntarily manage their woodlands for the continuing growth of forest crops.  Charles Barge of Noxubee County discusses how things have changed since his father began tree farming in 1941. He explains how poor forestry practices led to disease and infestations in the past like the Southern pine beetle invasion of the 1960s.

May 14, 2010

In 1935, Sam Alman Jr. moved from Arkansas to Gulfport to start his own soda bottling company.  His son, Sam Alman III recounts the story and discusses the early days of his family's soda business.

May 14, 2010

Sun Herald columnist Kat Bergeron has spent decades researching the history and folk lore of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. She debunks three popular myths about the Gulf Coast.

May 4, 2010

With the end of the Vietnam War came an influx of Vietnamese refugees to the United States.  Biloxi businessman Richard Gollott discusses the impact these refugees had on the Gulf Coast seafood industry. A story made even more poignant by the pending Gulf oil spill disaster.

May 4, 2010

The Civil War left many on both sides emotionally scarred.  Libby Hollingsworth of Port Gibson recalls the hardships endured by her great grandfather, Kell Shaifer as a rebel soldier. 

Hollingsworth recalls how a letter from a Yankee soldier after the war changed Kell Shaifer’s life.  She also reflects on the healing effect an unlikely friendship had on many.

Jan 5, 2010

After cotton is picked, the cotton fibers, called lint, must be separated from the seeds in a process known as “ginning.”  James Gray went to work for the Torrey Cotton Gin in Port Gibson as a young man. He explains the cotton ginning process and the importance of doing it correctly.

Jan 5, 2010

Ethel Patton D’Anjou of Alcorn recounts the story of her grandparents’ decision to leave the family farm in Carlisle in the late 1800s and journey to the newly opened Alcorn College.

Dec 16, 2009

In the early days of automobiles, learning to drive was an adventure.  As the son of the local Ford dealer, James Allen of Port Gibson learned to drive at a young age. Allen recalls how different the Model T was from other cars. He also remembers how his father taught a local rancher to drive his first car.

Dec 16, 2009

By the 1960s, railroads had lost much of their freight hauling business to trucks. Ray Ward of McComb recalls how track maintenance suffered as a result. As a car man, Ward’s job was to re-track derailed cars and locomotives. He explains how he was able to do this with a crew of only two men.

Dec 2, 2009

As World War Two raged on, women helped keep the trains rolling back home.  Bonnie Stedman of McComb remembers the work as difficult and dangerous.

Nov 18, 2009
During World War Two, women took jobs traditionally held by men.  Bonnie Stedman of McComb began working for the railroad in 1943 at the age of 17.  She recalls the dangers and rewards of working long hours in remote locations.
Nov 18, 2009
The civil rights movement brought increased job opportunities for African Americans.  Paul Leonard describes how work changed for black employees of the McComb Railroad Shop.  Leonard remembers the first two black employees of the McComb shop to become engineers.
Nov 4, 2009

The advent of Diesel-electric locomotives was a vast improvement over the steam engines they replaced.  John Balser worked as a machinist at the McComb Railroad repair shop. He recalls the pride that the steam engineers took in their locomotives. Balser also details how much more efficient the new Diesel engines were than their steam predecessors.

Oct 28, 2009
MS Moments 207: Woodrow Addison- Danger on the Rails

Working on the railroad was always been hard, dangerous work.  Woodrow Addison of McComb recalls the frequent derailments he experienced during his 38 years with Illinois Central.

Oct 22, 2009

Woodrow Addison worked for the Illinois Central Railroad shop in McComb for 38 years.  He worked first as a brakeman and then, a conductor.  Addison contrasts the duties of the two jobs.  He also discusses the advantages of diesel over steam power.

Oct 14, 2009
Many memorable movies have been made in Mississippi. Edna Joseph of Natchez worked for the Mississippi Film Commission finding local talent for these productions. Being involved with several film projects showed Joseph that movie stars are just regular people.
Oct 7, 2009

Growing up on a farm, Natchez resident Alonzo “Duck” Irving learned many things from his mother.  He discusses the food they grew and how he has benefited from his mother's wisdom. 

Sep 30, 2009
After the Civil War, the lands of many Mississippi Plantations were farmed by share croppers.  Alonzo “Duck” Irving of Natchez recalls growing up on such a plantation.
Sep 23, 2009
Today, modern supermarkets offer convenient one-stop grocery shopping.  But, Ruth Colter of Natchez recalls the days of street vendors and small corner grocery stores.
Sep 16, 2009

For thousands of troops during World War II, their journey began with a trip to Mississippi for training.  Ruth Colter of Natchez remembers helping to entertain those young men. As a member of the service group Military Maids, Colter helped to organize local dances for the troops.

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