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Mississippi Moments Podcast

These are the stories of our people in their own words. From sharecroppers to governors, the veterans, artists, writers, musicians, leaders, followers, all those who call Mississippi home. Since 1971 we've collected their memories. The technology has changed, but our mission remains the same: to preserve those wonderful stories. Listen to Mississippi Moments Monday through Friday. at 12:30pm on MPB think radio.
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Now displaying: February, 2013
Feb 22, 2013
MS Mo 346 Rev. Rodney Duke - The USS Pueblo Incident

On January 23rd, 1968, the USS Pueblo, a Naval Intelligence ship was seized in International waters by the North Korean Government. Reverend Rodney Duke of Lake, Mississippi was serving as a communications technician aboard the Pueblo at the time. For the next 334 days Duke and the rest of the crew endured over 200 interrogations. He remembers the physical and psychological torture and the effect it had on him. This extended version contains more graphic detail than the broadcast version.

Feb 15, 2013
MS Mo 345 Jim Kelly - From English Lookout to Logtown, Ext. Ver.

     Jim Kelly of Pearlington, grew up in the nearby town of English Lookout.  He recounts how English Lookout got its name and how lumber companies used schooners and tug boats to carry harvested timber down the Pearl River to Gulfport.

     The logging towns that sprang up along the Pearl River often had no roads and depended on boats for mail, supplies and transportation. Kelly remembers the mail boat of Captain Boardman that ran from Logtown to English Lookout.

Feb 1, 2013

In the mid-1960s, Mississippi began the process of desegregating its public schools.  Winston Fairley of Gulfport recalls transferring to a previously all-white school in Hattiesburg after finishing the eighth grade. 

As the son of a local civil rights leader, Fairley felt a sense of duty to represent his people and make his father proud.  Even so, he remembers the move left him feeling isolated within his own community.

Feb 1, 2013

Jewish holidays are traditionally associated with certain foods. Gail Goldberg of Greenwood discusses some of these dishes. She explains why, as the Jewish population of Greenwood has declined, holiday traditions have become even more important.  Goldberg also details the tremendous amount of effort that goes into preparing for the family’s annual Rosh Hashanah celebration.

Feb 1, 2013

In 1999, Erik Robert Fleming became the fiftieth African American to enter the Mississippi legislature in the modern era.  He discusses why he became interested in becoming a politician. Fleming also comments on race relations within the legislature and the need for coalitions.

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