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Mississippi Moments Podcast

After fifty years, we've heard it all. From the horrors of war to the struggle for civil rights, Mississippians have shared their stories with us. The writers, the soldiers, the activists, the musicians, the politicians, the comedians, the teachers, the farmers, the sharecroppers, the survivors, the winners, the losers, the haves, and the have-nots. They've all entrusted us with their memories, by the thousands. You like stories? We've got stories. After fifty years, we've heard it all.
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Now displaying: November, 2009
Nov 18, 2009
During World War Two, women took jobs traditionally held by men.  Bonnie Stedman of McComb began working for the railroad in 1943 at the age of 17.  She recalls the dangers and rewards of working long hours in remote locations.
Nov 18, 2009
The civil rights movement brought increased job opportunities for African Americans.  Paul Leonard describes how work changed for black employees of the McComb Railroad Shop.  Leonard remembers the first two black employees of the McComb shop to become engineers.
Nov 4, 2009

The advent of Diesel-electric locomotives was a vast improvement over the steam engines they replaced.  John Balser worked as a machinist at the McComb Railroad repair shop. He recalls the pride that the steam engineers took in their locomotives. Balser also details how much more efficient the new Diesel engines were than their steam predecessors.

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