Info

Mississippi Moments Podcast

After fifty years, we've heard it all. From the horrors of war to the struggle for civil rights, Mississippians have shared their stories with us. The writers, the soldiers, the activists, the musicians, the politicians, the comedians, the teachers, the farmers, the sharecroppers, the survivors, the winners, the losers, the haves, and the have-nots. They've all entrusted us with their memories, by the thousands. You like stories? We've got stories. After fifty years, we've heard it all.
RSS Feed
2022
November
October
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2021
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2014
December
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2013
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2012
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2011
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
January


2010
November
August
July
May
January


2009
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March


1970
January


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: Page 21
Mar 9, 2011

For many years after the repeal of Prohibition, Mississippi remained a ‘dry’ state. Rev. John Perkins of New Hebron recalls how his family made ends meet by selling moonshine whiskey. He explains the difference between ‘homebrew’ and ‘moonshine.’

Jan 18, 2011

Hundreds of volunteers travelled to Mississippi in 1964 to teach basic literacy to African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement. One of those volunteers, Sandra Adickes, shares her initial impressions of Hattiesburg.

Adickes also recalls a trip to the Hattiesburg Public library with six African American students in the first attempt to integrate the city’s library.

 

 

Jan 18, 2011

Dorothy Nunnery of Brandon worked as a nurse at the VA Hospital in Jackson for 32 years. She recalls her time at the Jackson Infirmary Nursing School during WWII. She also recounts her first encounter with bed bugs.

Jan 18, 2011

Built in 1918 between Mendenhall and Magee, the Mississippi State Tuberculosis Sanatorium provided care and isolation for those afflicted with this terrible disease.  Dorothy Nunnery of Brandon recalls living on the grounds of the Sanatorium during the 1930s. Nunnery also explains the purpose of the Preventorium and remembers a family who came to stay.

 

 

Jan 18, 2011

Former Mississippi Supreme Court, Armis E. Hawkins, served as a district attorney in Chickasaw County in the early 1950s. He looks back on his early career.

Jan 18, 2011

Mississippi Supreme Court Justice, Armis E. Hawkins, joined the service in June 1942 with ambitions of becoming an officer.  The Marine Corps had other plans. Hawkins recalls his service during WWII.

Jan 18, 2011

The first African American Mississippi Supreme Court Justice, Reuben Anderson, remembers the racial climate of 1960s Mississippi. At Tougaloo College, he was inspired by the activism around him. He looks back on his career and his beginnings as a civil rights lawyer.

Jan 18, 2011

Senator Thad Cochran nominated Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Michael Mills for a Federal Judgeship in 2001. Mills recounts a getting phone call from the Oval Office. Justice Mills’ confirmation hearing before the Senate was just two days after 9/11. Mills remembers the patriotism and resolve of Americans to overcome the tragedy in the immediate aftermath.

Jan 18, 2011

One of Justice Michael P. Mills’ fondest memories from his tenure on the Mississippi Supreme Court was his friend and colleague Justice Michael Sullivan. He shares some of his favorite memories of his friend.

Jan 18, 2011

Retired Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Robert Sugg has fond memories of his days on the bench.  He remembers of some of his fellow judges. Sugg also recounts a fishing trip with fellow justice Francis Bowling.

Jan 18, 2011

Retired Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Robert P. Sugg wanted to be a pilot during WWII.  He recalls how a perforated ear drum prevented him from serving. He discusses his early career.

Nov 18, 2010

In World War II, all-black combat units such as the Tuskegee Airmen gained widespread recognition for their service. However, most black soldiers served in support units away from the front line. Lee Spearman of Bay Springs describes the frustration of being assigned to such a unit. Spearman details the close proximity of the Pacific island battles and the death of American war correspondent, Ernie Pyle.

Nov 18, 2010

Many stories surround the naming of the town of D’Lo.  Long-time resident Chrysteen Flynt attempts to set the record straight. She also shares her memories of growing up there.

Nov 18, 2010

Many Italian immigrants settled in the Mississippi Delta bringing their culture and traditions with them.  John Bassie of Cleveland, MS recalls how his family celebrated the 4th of July, Italian style.

Nov 18, 2010

Growing up during World War II, Lynn Cartlidge of Hattiesburg found plenty of ways to earn money as a boy. He talks about his paper route, which ended up taking him to Camp Shelby.

Nov 18, 2010

Lee Davis of Hattiesburg shares his memories of growing up in a large and fun-loving family. He recalls practical jokes and holiday moments shared with loved ones.

Nov 12, 2010

This September marked the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. George Schloegel of Hancock Bank and now Mayor of Gulfport, discusses being prepared for the next disaster. He reflects on the real lessons of Katrina.

Nov 12, 2010

Greg Osaneha is a Nigerian who immigrated to the United States. He talks about what led him to leave his home. 

Osaneha explains what he feels are the strengths of the United States.

Nov 12, 2010

During WWII, the war with Japan was fought over tiny islands most people had never heard of.  Truman Ellis of Jackson recalls joining the Navy and his time in the Pacific.

Nov 12, 2010

In World War II, Alton Patterson’s unit was days from invading Japan when the country surrendered. He remembers the Japanese prisoners of war and his complex feelings toward the atomic bomb.

Nov 12, 2010

For Ellen McCarley of Port Gibson, some of her most cherished childhood memories are of Christmas.  She recalls how her mother made the season special.

 

Nov 12, 2010

During the early 20th Century, Biloxi was home to more than a dozen seafood processing plants.  Retired fisherman Tommy Schultz, Jr. recalls how each plant had its own unique work whistle.

Nov 12, 2010

Gordon Nanney reflects on the 50 + years he spent helping to bring electric power to the people of Mississippi.

Nov 12, 2010

In 1963, Dr. Gilbert Mason led a group of African-Americans into the waters of Biloxi beach.  This wade-in, to protest the ‘whites only’ rule of the day, was met with violent resistance from white citizens and the police. Ethel Clay remembers how the youth got involved in the wade-ins and the measures taken for their safety. Clay reflects on the cost of standing up for civil rights and the progress that we’ve made as a nation.

Nov 12, 2010

This spring marked the 50th anniversary of the first of the Gulf Coast wade-ins. Back then, most Mississippi beaches were for whites only.  During one of these wade-ins, Dr. Gilbert Mason led a group of African-Americans into the segregated waters of Biloxi beach.  What followed was one of the bloodiest race riots in Mississippi history with 71 arrested and dozens injured.

 

A small boy at the time, Le’Roy Carney recalls using the railroad tracks to flee the riot.  Carney also explains how the black community in Biloxi organized themselves to boycott those responsible for the violence at the beach.

1 « Previous 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Next » 25